Bestselling Fiction of the Week: 17/1/13

Every Sunday I’ll be posting the week’s top 5 selling fiction books, from the Sunday Times, Waterstones, the New York Times, and Amazon!

Titles in bold are books which appear in more than one list. The number in brackets is their position within the top 5 last week. (-) indicates a new entry.

The Sunday Times

24480276

#1 THE VERSIONS OF US – Laura Barnett (-)

One Day meets Sliding Doors. Hinged around one moment in time that has three possible outcomes, all of which are explored.

#2 A GOD IN RUINS – Kate Atkinson (-)

#3 DISCLAIMER – Renee Knight (-)

#4 THE BONES OF YOU – Debbie Howells (-)

#5 IN A DARK, DARK WOOD – Ruth Ware  (-)

 

Waterstones


GodInRuinsCover#1 A GOD IN RUINS – Kate Atkinson (-)

Teddy Todd – a man, poet, bomber pilot, father – navigates the perils of 20th century  life. Costa shortlisted 2015.

#2 DISCLAIMER – Renee Knight (-)

#3 ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE – Anthony Doerr (1)

#4 THE LITTLE PARIS BOOKSHOP – Nina George (-)

#5 MY BRILLIANT FRIEND – Elena Ferrante (3)

 

 

New York Times (Combined Print and E-book fiction)
Train#1 THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN – Paula Hawkins (1)

A woman sees the same couple every day on her route to work. But one day she sees something that will change all of their lives forever.

#2 ROGUE LAWYER -John Grisham (3)

#3 THE MARTIAN – Andy Weir (2)

#5 JANUARY – Audrey Carlan (-)

#5 ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE – Anthony Doerr (4)

Amazon
51PtmxP6VqL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_#1 FOLLOW YOU HOME – Mark Edwards (2)

Thrown off a night train during their travels, a couple experience a terrifying journey back. But the horror is just beginning…

#2 SLEEP TIGHT – RACHEL ABBOTT (4)

#3 A SPRING AFFAIR – Milly Johnson (-)

#4 WHERE THE MEMORIES LIE – Sibel Hodge (-)

#5 RUBY FLYNN – Nadine Dorries (-)

The Roundup: Not too many overlaps across the charts this week, but All the Light We Cannot See continues to cling on to its high positions. The World War II theme seems to be popular as Kate Atkinson’s A God in Ruins has also done very well.  Are we moving away from the runaway popularity of cliffhanger mysteries to the more chunky war-grounded epics? (Probably not, but it’s exciting to speculate!).

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